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"Prenatal Environmental Stressors Impair Postnatal Microglia Function and Adult Behavior in Male Mice," by Staci Bilbo, PhD, Haley Family Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Professor of Neurobiology and Cell Biology, Duke University

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Sponsor
Neuroscience Program
Location
https://illinois.zoom.us/j/83566081431?pwd=VllERlduN0hrUUYzQ1p0YTk2U2xKZz09
Virtual
wifi event
Date
Oct 19, 2021   4:00 pm  
Speaker
Staci Bilbo, Duke University
Contact
Neuroscience Program
E-Mail
nsp@life.illinois.edu
Phone
217-300-7978
Views
19
Originating Calendar
Neuroscience Program Seminars

Gestational exposure to environmental toxins and socioeconomic stressors are epidemiologically linked to neurodevelopmental disorders with strong male-bias, such as autism. We modeled these prenatal risk factors in mice, by co-exposing pregnant dams to an environmental pollutant and limited-resource stress, which robustly dysregulated the maternal immune system. Only male offspring displayed long-lasting behavioral abnormalities and alterations in the activity of brain networks encoding social interactions. Cellularly, prenatal stressors impaired microglial synaptic pruning within the anterior cingulate cortex, a central node of the social coding network, in males during early postnatal development. Precise inhibition of microglial phagocytosis during the same critical period mimicked the impact of prenatal stressors on a male-specific behavior, indicating that environmental stressors alter neural circuit formation in males via impairing microglia function during development.

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