IQUIST Seminar Series

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The Illinois Quantum Information Science and Technology Center hosts a series of talks about topics related to Quantum Information Sciences in its various forms, including (but not limiting to): Quantum computers, Quantum simulation, Measuring the elusive Majorana fermion, and Photons. Talks will be given by senior researchers as well as students and postdocs. 

IQUIST Seminar: "Quantum gravity experiments: a biased overview," Dan Carney, Berkeley National Laboratory

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Sponsor
IQUIST
Location
190 Engineering Sciences Building, 1101 W Springfield Ave, Urbana, IL 61801
Date
May 2, 2023   11:00 - 11:50 am  
Speaker
Dr. Daniel Carney, Staff Scientist, Berkeley National Laboratory
Contact
Hannah Stites
E-Mail
hstites2@illinois.edu
Phone
217-300-4072
Views
124

Quantum gravity experiments: a biased overview
 
Numerous ideas have been floated in the past decade or two to test possible signatures of quantum behavior in gravity in realistic experiments. I will give a high-level overview of this growing program. The main goal will be to bring clarity as to what exactly is being tested in each case, particularly with respect to predictions of perturbative gravity treated as a standard effective quantum field theory. Proposals covered will include tabletop experiments for coherence and entanglement in the Newton interaction, measurements of quantization effects in the gravitational radiation field, quantization effects in the cosmic microwave background, and "holographic noise" searches.

Bio: I am a theoretical physicist, originally trained in string theory-ish physics and now working near the theory-experiment intersection. I am a staff scientist at Berkeley National Lab (in terms of tenure, roughly equivalent to an assistant professor).

I use ideas from quantum information science to learn about fundamental physics. Most of my work is centered around the theory of measurement and how it applies to particle physics and gravity. This ranges from proposing new experiments (some of which are now real!) to more formal theoretical work.

Ultimately, I strongly suspect that quantum limits to measurement will play a central role in the formulation of a consistent quantum model of general relativity. In the meantime, many of these ideas have applications beyond fundamental physics, particularly to problems in quantum metrology and computing.

For Zoom link you may check the IQUIST calendar weekly email or contact Hannah Stites (hstites2@illinois.edu). To subscribe to our weekly email for event announcements, please go to https://lists.illinois.edu/lists/subscribe/iquist-announcements.

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