Mind in Vitro: an NSF Expedition In Computing

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MiV Seminar - Mark Yim - "Lessons from looking to biology for robots"

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Sponsor
NSF Expeditions - Mind in Vitro
Location
2405 Siebel Center for Computer Science ... or on zoom at https://illinois.zoom.us/j/82905513876?pwd=TVVCbm5DYXVzK0tOb0FublFGendpdz09
Virtual
wifi event
Date
Mar 3, 2023   4:00 - 5:00 pm   5:00pm
Speaker
Mark Yim
Contact
Gregory Pluta
E-Mail
gpluta@illinois.edu
Phone
217-244-2132
Views
201

Abstract:  Modular reconfigurable robotics has been studied for nearly three decades with thousands of papers and dozens of groups contributing.  Modular robotics has its roots in cellular robotics mimicking cell-like structures and has a variety of bio-inspired technologies. In this presentation, I'll give an overview of my group's efforts to build and control a variety of modular robotic systems with {connections to, ideas from, etc.} biology, and others that are not modular including flying robots and amoeba-like systems.  As we'll see, looking to biology for inspiration is often good, but often getting the right inspiration is important.
 
Bio:  Mark Yim is the Asa Whitney Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania.  He is the director of the GRASP Lab, the oldest robotics research laboratory in the country established in 1980.  His group has demonstrated a large range of robots -- a humanoid on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art to transforming robots that can change their shape to the smallest self-powered flying robot in the world. His current research focus includes reconfigurable truss robots that can help in search and rescue operations, swarms of boats that can attach together and form floating structures, swarms of small flying robots that can group into shapes that interact with humans and swarms of microscopic robots that can manufacture materials. His other interests include product design, robotic performance art, novel locomotion, low-cost manipulation, search and rescue as well as healthcare applications. Prior to Penn, he spent ten years in industry including positions as Principal Scientist at the Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC) and Virtual Technologies, a virtual reality startup.  He has founded three companies and has authored over 50 patents, several of which were awarded over $100m in litigation.  Honors include induction to the National Academy of Inventors, MIT's TR100, and the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching (UPenn's highest teaching honor). He received his PhD from Stanford University in Mechanical Engineering under Jean-Claude Latombe in Computer Science.

This presentation will be given through zoom, please join us in 2405 Siebel Center for Computer Science

Or join virtually on zoom at: https://illinois.zoom.us/j/82905513876?pwd=TVVCbm5DYXVzK0tOb0FublFGendpdz09

Pizza will be served following the presentation.

link for robots only