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AE590 Seminar: Bio-inspired Reconfigurable System Design via Effectiveness Based Topology Optimization

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Sponsor
Department of Aerospace Engineering
Location
CIF 2035
Date
Feb 27, 2023   4:00 - 5:00 pm  
Speaker
Dr. Gregory Reich | Principal Scientist, Aerospace Vehicles Division in the Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory
Contact
Courtney McLearin
E-Mail
aero-events@illinois.edu
Views
23
Originating Calendar
Aerospace Engineering Seminars

Abstract:
A morphing system’s performance is heavily affected by its physical design, manufacturing considerations and how it is operated. This project explores how these factors can be accounted for when using bio-inspired strategies to optimize the topology of a morphing wing’s airfoil. An L-system based approach is used to define the design variables that construct a graph based topology representing the airfoil’s internal structure and actuators, allowing for a wide range of airfoil designs to be considered. The discrepancies due to additive manufacturing limitations between the simulated and actual behavior of airfoils represented using graph based topologies are explored. Several objectives measuring how well a morphing wing aircraft can fly a trajectory are used to optimize an airfoil’s topology for effectiveness. These objectives include tracking performance on individual trajectories, tracking performance on worst case trajectories and the minimum flight times needed to reach pre-specified flight states. Results compare how well topologies optimized for these different objectives perform relative to each other.

About the speaker:
Dr. Reich is currently the Principal Scientist for the Aerospace Vehicles Division in the Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory. He is responsible for the overall health and strategic guidance of the division’s basic and applied research competencies. Dr. Reich received a Bachelor's degree from Georgia Tech in 1992, a Master's degree from MIT in 1994, and a PhD from the University of Colorado in 2000, all in Aerospace Engineering.

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