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PMPB Seminar: Incorporating Phytophthora and Soybean Aphid Resistance into Edamame Varieties

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Topic
academic
Sponsor
Departments of Plant Biology and Crop Sciences
Location
W109 Turner Hall
Date
Mar 13, 2019   12:00 - 12:50 pm  
Speaker
Amanda Bardeau - Graduate Student, Department of Crop Sciences, UIUC
Contact
Carl Bernacchi
E-Mail
bernacch@illinois.edu
Views
2
Originating Calendar
Plant Biology - Events

Physiological & Molecular Plant Biology (PMPB) Seminar – IB 513/CPSC 598

 

Wednesday, March 13, 2019, 12:00 – 12:50 PM // W-109 Turner Hall

Amanda Bardeau

Graduate Student, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Incorporating Phytophthora and Soybean Aphid Resistance into Edamame Varieties

Edamame is an increasingly popular large seeded soybean crop harvested at growth stage R6 for human consumption as a vegetable. The edible soybean has gained popularity in the United States for its health benefits and often found in organic, niche markets. Edamame has better nutrition, protein, and taste compared to grain soybeans, but is often more susceptible to diseases and pests than grain soybeans because of the lack of resistance breeding. In particular, edamame varieties are susceptible to Phytophthora root and stem rot and soybean aphids. Phytophthora root and stem rot is caused by an oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae that can be a devastating pathogen due to its ability to infect soybeans at any growth stage. Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines) are pests that were introduced from Asia around 2001, and cause damage on soybeans by feeding on sap from the phloem and by transmitting plant viruses. Since edamame is a specialty food crop and often an organic crop, limited pesticide management options are available for Phytophthora root and stem rot and soybean aphid control unlike grain soybean where pesticides complemented with host resistance when available are often used. The main objective in breeding edamame varieties has been to maintain traits related to large seed size and consumption without consideration to disease and pest resistance. My objectives were to: (i) introgress Phytophthora root and stem rot Rps1k and soybean aphid Rag 1 and Rag 2 resistance genes into Beerfriend, BeSweet 292, Gardensoy 24, Gardensoy 41, and Tohya edamame varieties, (ii) and phenotype and genotype progenies for resistance to Phytophthora root and stem rot and the soybean aphid. Phytophthora root and stem rot phenotyping resulted in homozygous and/or heterozygous resistant introgression of Rps1k in Beerfriend, BeSweet 292, and Tohya edamame varieties. Successful genotyping of progeny resulted in homozygous resistant introgression of Rag 1 in BeSweet 292, Gardensoy 24, and Tohya, and homozygous resistant introgression of Rag 2 in Beerfriend, Gardensoy 24, Gardensoy 41, and Tohya edamame varieties.

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