Integrative Biology

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PMPB Seminar: Genetic Control of Guard Cell Movement via the CO2 Stomatal Signaling Pathway in Zea Mays

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Topic
academic
Sponsor
Departments of Plant Biology and Crop Sciences
Location
W109 Turner Hall
Date
Mar 6, 2019   12:00 - 12:50 pm  
Speaker
Robert J. Twohey, III - Graduate Student, Department of Crop Sciences, UIUC
Contact
Carl Bernacchi
E-Mail
bernacch@illinois.edu
Views
5
Originating Calendar
Plant Biology - Events

Physiological & Molecular Plant Biology (PMPB) Seminar – IB 513/CPSC 598

 

Wednesday, March 6, 2019, 12:00 – 12:50 PM // W-109 Turner Hall

Robert J. Twohey, III

Graduate Student, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Genetic Control of Guard Cell Movement via the CO2 Stomatal Signaling Pathway in Zea Mays

Plants uptake CO2 through their stomatal pores for photosynthesis. Simultaneously, there is a corresponding efflux of water via transpiration. Stomata control this CO2 and transpiration balance by altering their aperture size via guard cell movement. Stomata respond to various environmental factors, including atmospheric CO2 levels. Given current climate trends, the production of more efficient crops by reducing transpiration is of increasing importance for sustainable agriculture production. Dissection of the CO2 stomatal signaling pathway will develop new insights into ways of optimizing stomatal regulation for maximum productivity and transpiration efficiency. Genetic mutants in Zea mays were identified from a transposon insertion collection, and leaf level gas exchange measurements were used to investigate the physiological response to environmental stimuli. This research found both similarities and differences between Z. mays and what has been reported in dicots. These results are important for crop specific tuning of stomatal response to dynamic field conditions now and in the future. 

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