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ISWS Seminar: Climate Modeling and Impact Assessment in the Midwest and Great Lakes Region Using Multi-Scale Modeling Approach

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Sponsor
Illinois State Water Survey, Prairie Research Institute
Location
Illinois Room, Illinois State Water Survey, 2204 Griffith Dr., Champaign
Date
May 16, 2018   11:00 am  
Speaker
Ashish Sharma, Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Notre Dame
Views
31

Ashish Sharma, a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, will give a seminar on Climate Modeling and Impact Assessment in the Midwest and Great Lakes Region Using Multi-Scale Modeling Approach at 11 AM on May 16 in the Illinois Room in Building 2 of the Water Survey. 

Abstract: The effects of climate change on the Midwest and Great Lakes Region are expected to include extreme changes in temperature, increasing precipitation in winter and spring, and (based on observations) increasingly intense convective storms in the warm season. In urban settings, changes in climate combined with changes in urban heat island effects are expected to affect both extreme heat and humidity, and urban stormwater impacts. To quantify these kinds of regionally specific impacts in greater detail, integrated simulation models at a range of spatial and temporal scales are needed. In this talk, I will show some illustrations of dynamical downscaling using Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model ranging from 12- to 4-km spatial resolution for the Great Lakes region, and high resolution (1-km to 300-m) models developed for targeted urban studies. A few initial studies have attempted to quantify changes in convective storm intensity and urban heating, but much more work is needed in this area to better quantify local impacts.  Impacts to extreme heat and humidity in urban settings intensify under climate change, and fine-scale sensitivity experiments show that attempts to adapt to increased urban heating using energy-saving green or cool roofs may result in reduced vertical and horizontal air circulation and adversely impact air quality. I will also discuss the role of green roofs adaptive strategy in reducing heat stress in vulnerable urban communities via a multidisciplinary approach.

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