Prairie Research Institute - All Events

Back to Listing

ISTC Seminar | Managing Water to Increase Resiliency of Drained Agricultural Landscapes

Event Type
Seminar/Symposium
Topics
agriculture, water quality
Sponsor
Illinois Sustainable Technology Center
Location
New Location: Forbes Natural History Building Room 1005 - 1816 S Oak St, Champaign, IL 61820 (metered parking in the lot; Yellow Bus stops 1 block away.)
Date
Mar 22, 2018   12:15 - 1:15 pm  
Speaker
Dr. Jane Frankenberger, Purdue University
Cost
Free
Registration
Watch Online
Contact
Elizabeth Meschewski
E-Mail
elm2@illinios.edu
Views
221
Originating Calendar
Prairie Research Institute - Events

Abstract: Drained croplands are some of the most productive lands in the world, but nitrate and phosphorus losses through tile drains contribute to eutrophication, and  our conventional tile drainage systems do not address the fact that drained lands can experience both water excess and water deficit within a year. Storing drained water within the landscape, and potentially recycling it back onto crops, could increase the sustainability of water for agriculture, particularly as intense rainfall and prolonged summer drought are expected to increase under future climate change. This presentation will discuss innovative drainage systems that can mitigate these issues, our research to determine and increase their effectiveness, and engagement with the drainage industry and agricultural producers to advance strategies that increase resiliency and reduce nutrient losses from drained agricultural land.

Bio: Jane Frankenberger is a Professor in Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University. Her research focuses on agricultural watershed management, developing drainage and agricultural water management strategies to reduce nutrient losses from subsurface drained land. Currently she leads a 9-state project to increase the retention and recycling of drainage water for greater resilience of drained agricultural land (http://transformingdrainage.org). She engages with the drainage industry and agricultural producers as well as agencies, for example as visiting scientist at USDA-NIFA and USEPA and science advisor for USDA-NRCS, to advance transformations in drainage practice to improve water quality and increase resilience. 

link for robots only