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CWL Lecture: "Looking at Euro-African Legacies Today"

Event Type
Lecture
Topics
africa, colonialism, morocco, postcolonial studies, spain
Sponsor
Department of Spanish and Portuguese; Department of Comparative and World Literature; European Union Center; Department of Anthropology
Location
Lincoln Hall 1090, 702 S. Wright St, Urbanan, IL 61801
Date
Oct 9, 2018   3:30 - 5:00 pm  
Speaker
Yolanda Aixelà-Cabré, Professor of Anthropology at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
Cost
Free and Open to the Public
Contact
Eric Calderwood
E-Mail
ecalderw@illinois.edu
Views
46
Originating Calendar
European Union Center Events

 

This lecture explores mutual influences between Europe and Africa through a postcolonial lens. First, it will analyze Euro-African legacies in Africa, looking at Hispano-African imprints in the former African colonies of Morocco and Equatorial Guinea. The objective is to make visible mutual influences between Europe and Africa, showing some of the different effects that Spanish colonialism had in postcolonial Morocco. Second, it will examine Euro-African legacies in Europe, relating policies for managing diversity in Europe today with the management of ethnic diversity during the colonial past. The goal is to expose the roots of the Spanish assimilationist management policy, which has struggled to integrate extra-European minorities, such as immigrants from Equatorial Guinea or Morocco, as well as Spanish minorities, such as Catalans and Basques.

 

Speaker Bio:

Yolanda Aixelà-Cabré is a Professor of Anthropology at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). She is the author of numerous books and articles on Spanish colonialism in Africa and also on such topics as migration, memory, and multiculturalism. Her most recent publications include The Management of Religious, Ethnic, and Cultural Diversity in Europe in the 21st Century (Edwin Mellen, 2018) and In the Footsteps of Spanish Colonialism in Morocco and Equatorial Guinea (Lit Verlag, 2018).

 

Photo of Spanish-Morocco border in 2004, taken by Wikimedia Commons user Jguk 2

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