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Un/Doing | Hilary N. Green: "Untangling Campus Histories: Race, Memory, and the Hallowed Grounds Project"

Event Type
Lecture
Sponsor
Humanities Research Institute, presented with the Department of History
Location
Levis Faculty Center, Room 422
Date
Oct 13, 2022   7:30 pm  
Speaker
Hilary N. Green, James B. Duke Professor of Africana Studies, Davidson College
Contact
Humanities Research Institute
E-Mail
info-hri@illinois.edu
Views
189
Originating Calendar
HRI

"Untangling Campus Histories: Race, Memory, and the Hallowed Grounds Project"

Drawing on her research on slavery at the University of Alabama, Hilary Green explores the need for recovering and untangling institutional campus histories of race and slavery and how understanding the enslaved campus experience is essential for institutional reconciliation efforts in the present.

About the Speaker

Hilary Green is the James B. Duke Professor of Africana Studies at Davidson College. She earned her Ph.D. in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research and teaching interests include the intersections of race, class, and gender in African American history, the American Civil War, Reconstruction, Civil War Memory, the US South, 19th Century America, and the Black Atlantic.

She is the author of Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890 (Fordham University Press, 2016). She is currently writing a second book manuscript exploring how everyday African Americans remembered and commemorated the Civil War from 1863 to the present. She is also co-editing The Civil War and the Summer of 2020: Race, Violence, Resistance and Memory in the United States with Andy L. Slap and has an OAH-NPS Historic Resource Study on History African American Schools in the South, 1865-1900 (forthcoming Fall 2022).

In 2015, she created the Hallowed Grounds Project which explores the history of race, slavery, and memory at the University of Alabama and the post-emancipation developments in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This ongoing scholarly project seeks to make accessible sources, alternate campus tours, publications, and other materials for understanding the history of slavery at the University of Alabama and its legacy. She has several forthcoming publications drawing on this campus history project.

In addition, she is the Chief Reader Designate for AP US History, 2022-2023, Digital Media Editor responsible for Muster, the blog for the Journal of Civil War Era, and the co-series editor with J. Brent Morris of the Reconstruction Reconsidered, a University of South Carolina Press book series. Re-Imagining Civil War and Reconstruction Histories Presented with the Department of History.


Presented with the Department of History. 

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