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EUC Lecture Series: Socialist Nightmare or Happiest People on Earth? The Nordic Welfare States in Popular Culture

Event Type
Lecture
Topics
academic, culture, europe, scandinavia
Sponsor
European Union Center
Location
Foreign Languages Building, Rm 1080 (Lucy Ellis Lounge)
Date
Feb 23, 2018   12:00 pm  
Speaker
Verena Höfig, Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Cost
Free and open to the public
Contact
Sebnem Ozkan
E-Mail
asozkan@illinois.edu
Phone
217-244-0570
Views
22
Originating Calendar
European Union Center Events

Is there such a thing as a poetics of the welfare state? This talk will focus on the welfare states of Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Finland, and Norway, and the ways in which Nordic welfare policies are picked up and negotiated in popular works of art from the 1950s until today. Building on close analysis of influential works of literature and visual art from Scandinavia, the United Kingdom and the United States, this presentation addresses historical factors and characteristics of the socio-cultural imaginary surrounding the rise and, some argue, subsequent dismantling of the Nordic welfare states.
Aside from offering a fascinating perspective on the Nordic countries and illustrating some of their most pressing social issues, this exploration of literature, film, design, and politics also reveals some of the core differences between Nordic and Anglo-American approaches to individual freedom and equality.


Verena Höfig is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She holds a PhD in Scandinavian Studies from UC Berkeley. Specializing on Northern Europe, Verena's research focuses on the intersection of literature, material culture, and social history in Scandinavia from the Viking Age until today. Her first book "Icelandic Origins - A History of Iceland's First Viking Settler" examines representations of the figure of the first Icelander in the context of (national) identity, nationalism, and memory formation. Besides coursework in Medieval Studies (Old Norse-Icelandic language, mythology, Icelandic sagas and poetry), Verena also teaches classes on modern subjects pertaining to Scandinavia, including Swedish language and literature.

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